Pittsburgh receives significant federal grants for Hill District infrastructure

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REGION. WE’RE TALKING ABOUT A $11.3 MILLION GRANT FOR THIS PATHWAYS TO EQUITY PROJECT. THEY DESCRIBE THIS AS A HUMAN-FOCUSED INFRASTRUCTURE THAT WILL HELP REVITALIZE AND RECONNECT PITTSBURGH’S HILL DISTRICT NEIGHBORHOOD. CURRENT FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATOR STEPHANIE POLLACK JOINS MAYOR GAINEY, COUNTY EXECUTIVE FITZGERALD AND COMMUNITY LEADERS ON THE ROOFTOP OF THE HILL DISTRICT’S THELMA LOVETTE YMCA TO TALK ABOUT THIS. >> THE INVESTMENT IS NOT JUST AN OPPORTUNITY TO IMPROVE THE INFRASTRUCTURE, BUT TO DO OUR CONTRIBUTION TO SUPPORTING REAL QUALITY OF LIFE FOR REAL PEOPLE. PEOPLE WHO HAVE OFTEN Felt ignored, or worst of all, forgotten. >> HOW WE ARE REBUILDING THE VIBRANCY OF THE HILL DISTRICT. THIS IS HOW WE CREATE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES. >> THE MONEY FOR THE PROJECT WILL FUND THE REBUILDING OF INTERSECTIONS AND CORRIDORS SUCH AS HERE ON CENTER AVENUE. AS WELL AS CITY STAIRS, SIDEWALKS, GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE AND DISABLED-ACCESSIBLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR PEDESTRIANS. IT WILL HELP RECONNECT THE UPPER AND LOWER HILL AND DOWNTOWN. >> WHEN WE TALK ABOUT SIDEWALKS, WHEN WE TALK ABOUT STREETS, WHEN WE TALK ABOUT CITY STAIRCASES. WHEN WE TALK ABOUT THE HILL’S INFRASTRUCTURE AND WHAT WE MUST DO TO REBUILD THE HILL, THIS PROMOTION COULD NOT HAVE COME AT A BETTER TIME. HILL COMMUNITY LEADERS SAY IT WILL HELP WITH REHABILITATION EFFORTS. >> IT HELPS US DEVELOP THE HUMAN CAPITAL IN OUR COMMUNITY. IT HELPS PEOPLE GET DOWNTOWN TO JOBS THAT ARE WAITING DOWNTOWN >> IT’S THE VOLUME OF INVESTMENT THAT IS SO EXCITING TO ME. AN $11.3 MILLION INVESTMENT IN THE HILL DISTRICT COMMUNITY SPECIFICALLY IN INFRASTRUCTURE? THIS IS A GAME CHANGER. >> WE KNOW THAT $11:00.3 MILLION INVESTED IN THE HILL DISTRICT CAN MAKE A REALLY BIG DIFFERENCE BECAUSE OF THE HISTORICAL UNDER-INVESTMENT IN THIS DISTRICT AND OTHER NEIGHBORHOODS

Pittsburgh receives significant federal grants for Hill District infrastructure

Pittsburgh’s Hill District will see more than $11 million in infrastructure improvements thanks to a federal grant from bipartisan infrastructure bills landed by the city. Watch the report from the Hill District: Click on the video player above. The Biden administration said the city’s proposal is among the “best of the best” applications for the RAISE grant, which stands for Rebuild American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity — people who often ignore themselves or, worst, forget themselves felt,” said Stephanie Pollack, acting Federal Roads Administrator. Reconnect the city neighborhood. Pollack was joined by Mayor Ed Gainey, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald and community leaders on the roof p from the Hill District’s Thelma Lovette YMCA to speak about it. “This is how we’re rebuilding the vibrancy of the Hill District. That’s how we create economic opportunity,” Gainey said. Money for the project will fund the rebuilding of street crossings and corridors like Center Avenue, as well as city stairs, sidewalks, green infrastructure, and pedestrian improvements accessible to people with disabilities. It will help reconnect the upper and lower hills and downtown.” When we talk about sidewalks, when we talk about streets, when we talk about city stairs, when we talk about hill infrastructure and what we need to do around to rebuild the mound, this grant could not have come at a better time,” Gainey said. Hill community leaders say it will help with the redevelopment effort and bring new businesses to the neighborhood. “It helps us develop the human capital in our community. It helps people get downtown to jobs that are waiting downtown,” said Rev. Lee Walls of the Amani Development Team. “It’s the size of the investment that’s so exciting to me. An $11.3 million investment in the Hill District community specifically for infrastructure? This is a game changer,” said Marimba Milliones, President and CEO of Hill Community Development Corporation. Pollack said, “We know that $11.3 million invested in the Hill District can make a really big difference because of the underinvestment in this district and other similar neighborhoods across the country.” It starts the healing process. It’s starting to say that we realize that what we did 50, 60 years ago didn’t work. And we’re trying everything we can to make sure we connect the people back from the Hill to the cultural fabric of downtown, Oakland, Lawrenceville and other areas that we know we want to connect the whole city,” Gainey said. “This is what we’re doing to restore what was taken from this neighborhood, and it starts with the infrastructure.”

Pittsburgh’s Hill District will see more than $11 million in infrastructure improvements thanks to a federal grant from bipartisan Infrastructure Act funds provided by the city.

Watch the report from the Hill District: Click on the video player above.

The Biden administration said the city’s proposal is among the “best of the best” for the RAISE grant, which stands for “Rebuild American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity.”

“The investment represents not only an opportunity to improve infrastructure, but to do our part to support real quality of life for real people — people who have often felt ignored or, worst of all, forgotten,” said Stephanie Pollack, deputy federal road administrator.

The $11.3 million grant for this New Pathways to Equity project is described as “people-centric” infrastructure that will help revitalize and reconnect the city’s neighborhood.

Pollack met with Mayor Ed Gainey, Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald and community leaders on the roof of Thelma Lovette YMCA in the Hill District to discuss it.

“This is how we’re rebuilding the vibrancy of the Hill District. This is how we create economic opportunity,” Gainey said.

Money for the project will fund the rebuilding of street crossings and corridors like Center Avenue, as well as city stairs, sidewalks, green infrastructure, and pedestrian improvements accessible to people with disabilities. It will help reconnect the upper and lower hills and downtown.

“If we’re talking about sidewalks, if we’re talking about roads, if we’re talking about city stairs, if we’re talking about Hilltop infrastructure and what we need to do to rebuild Hillside, this grant couldn’t have come at a better time,” said Gainey.

Hill community leaders say it will help with the redevelopment effort and bring new businesses to the neighborhood.

“It helps us develop the human capital in our community. It helps people come downtown to jobs that are waiting downtown,” said Rev. Lee Walls of the Amani Development Team.

“For me, the investment volume is so exciting. An $11.3 million investment in the Hill District community specifically for infrastructure? This is a game changer,” said Marimba Milliones, President and CEO of Hill Community Development Corporation.

“It’s about people, the people who are using this newer, safer, more modern infrastructure, and what it’s going to do to improve their lives every day,” Pollack said. “We know that $11.3 million invested in the Hill District can make a really big difference because of the underinvestment in this district and other similar neighborhoods across the country.”

“It starts the healing process. It’s starting to say that we realize that what we did 50, 60 years ago didn’t work. And we’re doing everything we can to make sure we reconnect the people of the Hill with the cultural fabric of downtown, to Oakland, to Lawrenceville, and to other areas that we know we want to connect the whole city,” Gainey said “This is what we’re doing to restore what was taken from this neighborhood, and it starts with the infrastructure.”

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