Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects

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Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Exterior PhotographyMoshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - exterior photography, windowMoshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - exterior photography, facadeMoshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Exterior Photography+ 15

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Exterior Photography
© Amit Geron

Text description of the architects. Kimmel Eshkolot Architects officially unveils the brand new Moshe Novomesky Visitors Center in Sodom, Israel, overlooking the Dead Sea, an open-air museum that allows visitors to learn about life and work in the Dead Sea region from the 20th century to the present day to experience.

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - exterior photography, facade
© Amit Geron
Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Image 12 of 15
floor plans
Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - exterior photography, window
© Amit Geron

An ecological marvel at the lowest point on earth, the Dead Sea lies 427 meters below sea level and is the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With the opening of the new and innovative Dead Sea Visitor Center, Kimmel Eshkolot continues his legacy of designing innovative and timeless structures that enhance the cultural landscape across Israel. The visitor center is based on the restoration and preservation of the Potash Company’s original site in Sodom, a city commonly known as the setting for the biblical story of Sodom and Gomorrah.

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Exterior Photography
© Amit Geron
Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - interior photography, window, door, facade
© Amit Geron

The visitor center is a reinterpretation of the pioneering camp and community structures built for Israel’s salt mining industry, dating back to the early 20th century. Located on the arid and scenic Route 90 in southern Israel, the complex camouflages itself into the limestone landscape and retains its original essence as a humble place to work and live. The site is a testament to the history of Israel’s agricultural roots and the region’s development as a prodigy of ecological phenomena. Within the visitor center grounds, guests can enter a variety of preserved buildings consisting of industrial plants, a commercial building, a dining hall and a residential complex, all of which have been remodeled and repurposed to house exhibitions, historical photographs and other visual experiences related to the Dead Sea and his story.

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Exterior Photography
© Amit Geron
Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Image 14 of 15
elevation

For the visitor center, Kimmel Eshkolot maintained the building’s north-south orientation and added modern air-conditioning systems to create a comfortable experience for all guests. Kimmel Eshkolot used wood and metal shading panels in the 1930s to provide protection from the region’s harsh climate, where temperatures can reach 50 degrees Celsius. Because the position and materiality of the original buildings were designed without the use of modern air conditioning, Kimmel Eshkolot saw the benefits of the natural breezes flowing through the site due to the southerly orientation of each of the buildings. To enhance protection from the harsh climate, each of the buildings was supported by 1.5 to 2 meter thick concrete slabs and timber cladding specially designed and treated for the dry, arid and sun-drenched climate.

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - interior photography, beams
© Amit Geron
Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - interior photography, beams, steel
© Amit Geron

In its new incarnation, the Potash Company’s original site is transformed into an open-air museum, reflecting the way of life of the indigenous people of the Dead Sea region and how their remoteness and location were made accessible through the determination of their residents. The design of the visitor center is based on the idea of ​​a tapestry that identifies the buildings at specific points in history, remodeling them and adding new parts and functions to exist as a contemporary museum. In preserving the site, the architects considered the existing landscape and the sensibility of its site to manifest a structure that elegantly blends into the rocky landscape.

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - exterior photography, facade, windows
© Amit Geron
Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - Image 15 of 15
section

The Visitor Center also includes a complex of content-based attractions designed to offer a diverse visitor experience to a wide audience while respecting its architectural heritage as a small village that helped pave the way for a sustainable habitat of this once isolated region. The Moshe Novomesky Visitors Center on the Dead Sea follows several recently announced and built cultural projects by Kimmel Eshkolot, including the Albania Jewish Museum in Vlora (2025), the Steinhardt Museum of Natural History in Tel Aviv (2019), and the Mount Herzl Memorial in Jerusalem ( 2018). Kimmel Eshkolot also received the Dedalo Minosse Award in Italy for the highly acclaimed Mount Herzl Memorial.

Moshe Novomesky Dead Sea Visitor Center / Kimmel Eshkolot Architects - exterior photography, coast
© Amit Geron

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